2014:2 Issue

Editorial2014:2 Issue

There are so many other demands on a translator’s working time these days, from social media to public speaking, blogging and writing. We have become more public-facing, which is good for the profile of the profession, but does not suit every temperament.This issue tries to cover multiple aspects of the translator’s trade, combining translated extracts with a cluster of articles.

The common thread in the articles is the interaction between translated fiction and the British publishing industry,both now and in the past. We learn that Swedish children’s books have had a cheerful if chequered career in the UK over the past sixty-five years, while the current vogue for ‘crossover’ fiction could also help Swedish writers into today’s English-speaking book market. In 1988 Joan Tate, translating the start of Göran Tunström’s TheThief, asked in SBR:‘How would YOU put it?’ Now, twenty-six years later, Ian Giles provides some suggestions, and ruminates on why success in Sweden is no guarantee of the same here.

Graphic novels across Europe have never been more diverse and innovative. European Literature Night in London this May featured its first graphic novelist event, to coincide with the start of a major British Library exhibition,‘Comics Unmasked’, and Swedish comics were showcased at the Angoulême International Comics Festival this spring. At a seminar entitled ‘Beyond Nordic Noir’ at the London Book Fair in April, representatives of Nordic cultural organisations tipped graphic novels as one of the current trends to watch out for, so what better time for SBR to present a range of Swedish examples of the art? They range from Lina Neidenstam’s ebullient and socially perceptive Zelda cartoons, via the intriguing crime-fiction miniatures of Per Thörn (abetted by artists Allan Haverholm and Jimmy Wallin) to Marcus Ivarsson’s subtle-toned take on a Swedish classic, Selma Lagerlöf’s Tale of a Manor.

Swedish fiction is also represented here by Jens Liljestrand’s blackly humorous observations of the perversities of modern life and Jesper Weithz’s contemporary thriller with environmental undertones. Karin Boye’s poem, meanwhile, transports us back to Linköping Cathedral in 1938.

The reviews section covers Fiction, Non-Fiction, Poetry, Young Adult Fiction and a new feature, ‘Lost Treasure’.

Browse Latest : Freshco Flyer | Food Basics Flyer

-

from: Transitional Space

Translated and Introduced by Fiona Graham

Fiona Graham introduces Jens Liljestrand's blackly humorous observations of the perversities of modern life and presents her translation of the story Transitional Space from his 2008 fiction debut Paris-Dakar.

-

Success Doesn't Always Sell: Why Didnt Göran Tunström Do Better In English?

In 1988 Joan Tate, translating the start of Göran Tunström's The Thief, asked in SBR: "How would YOU put it?" Now, twenty-six years later, Ian Giles provides some suggestions, and ruminates on why success in Sweden is no guarantee of the same in the UK.

-

Swedish Children's Literature in the United Kingdom, 1950-2010

Charlotte Berry explores the rich variety of Swedish children’s literature published in British translation since 1950. Swedish children’s titles have consistently outnumbered those coming to British shores from their Nordic neighbours. Which British publishers have been interested in investing in Swedish children’s literature? Who are the translators and illustrators, and which authors and genres have endured?

-

A Farewell to Age Restrictions? The Rise of Crossover Fiction in Swedish

Agnes Broomé and Nichola Smalley consider whether the current vogue for "crossover" fiction could also help Swedish writers into today's English-speaking book market.

-

Visualising a Classic: A graphic-novel version of Selma Lagerlöf's En herrgårdssägen

Introduced and translation adapted by Ruth Urbom

Selma Lagerlöf's story En herrgårdssägen (The Tale of a Manor), first published in 1899, has served as the source material for a film, an opera and a stage drama over the years. Now it exists as a graphic novel as well, in a version created by Marcus Ivarsson.

Our printed journal reproduces two pages from Ruth Urbom's translation, but a complete chapter is available here on the website.

-

Variations on a Theme: Order is Always Maintained

Text by Pär Thörn. Illustrations by 24 graphic artists. Excerpts introduced and illustrated by Ruth Urbom

Ruth Urbom presents her translations of samples from two different stories in Order is Always Maintained, a volume of 23 graphic short stories with text by Pär Thörn, who is known as an experimental poet and sound artist. Each of the brief stories has been illustrated by a different artist.

-

from: Zelda

Introduced and Translated by B.J. Epstein

B. J. Epstein introduces Lina Neidestam's Zelda, a "bright, concupiscent, and somewhat provocative character", who appears in three collections of comics by Lina Neidestam. Concluding that "there isn't a character in English-language comics quite like Zelda", Epstein goes on to present her translation of an extract from the latest collection, Zelda vs. The Patriarchy.

-

Linköping Cathedral February 1938

Poem Introduced and Translated by Bruce Phenix

Bruce Phenix introduces Karin Boye's poem cycle Linköping Cathedral February 1938, inspired by her visit to the great 13th-15th century cathedral in Linköping, and presents his translation of the poem.

-

from What Does Not Grow Must Die

Introduced and translated by Dominic Hinde

Jesper Weithz is an award-winning environmental journalist and novelist. His literary debut is an engaging and thought-provoking hybrid of contemporary thriller and a more subtle and existential critique of modern Swedish living with dark environmental undertones. Dominic Hinde introduces Weithz's work and presents his translation of an excerpt from What Does Not Grow Must Die.


BOOKSHELF: REVIEWS, edited by Anna Paterson and Fiona Graham

MinnesburenEva Runefelt, Minnesburen (The Memory Cage)

Albert Bonniers förlag, 2013.

Reviewed by Anna Tebelius ▸Read Review


MaIda Börjel, Ma

Albert Bonniers förlag, 2014.

Reviewed by Anna Tebelius ▸Read Review


Fenixelden. Drottning Kristina som alchemistSusanna Åkerman, Fenixelden. Drottning Kristina som alchemist (The Phoenix Fire: Queen Kristina as Alchemist)

Gidlunds, 2013.

Reviewed by Mia Österlund ▸Read Review


GermanernaTore Janson, Germanerna (The Germans)

Norstedts, 2013.

Reviewed by John Gilmour ▸Read Review


Frihetens pris är okänt. Om demokratiska revolutioner i Georgien, Ukraina och KirgizistanAnna-Lena Laurén, Frihetens pris är okänt. Om demokratiska revolutioner i Georgien, Ukraina och Kirgizistan (The Unknown Price of Freedom. On democratic revolutions in Georgia, Ukraine and Kyrgyzstan)

Schildts & Söderströms, 2013.

Reviewed by Darcy Hurford ▸Read Review


WOW. Ansikter om finländsk arkitekturJan-Erik Andersson, WOW. Ansikter om finländsk arkitektur (WOW. Opinions on Finland's Architecture)

Schildts & Söderströms, 2014.

Reviewed by Kate Lambert ▸Read Review


KairosAndrzej Tichý, Kairos

Albert Bonniers förlag, 2013.

Reviewed by Dominic Hinde ▸Read Review


Region XPär Thörn and Andrzej Tichý, Region X

Orosdi-Back, 2014.

Reviewed by Anna Paterson ▸Read Review


Jag heter inte MiriamMajgull Axelsson, Jag heter inte Miriam (My Name is not Miriam)

Brombergs, 2014.

Reviewed by Janny Middelbeek-Oortgiesen ▸Read Review


Det jag redan minns. En roman i 16 novellerMats Kempe, Det jag redan minns. En roman i 16 noveller (What I Already Remember. A Novel in 16 Short Stories)

Norstedts, 2014.

Reviewed by Sarah Death ▸Read Review


Future PerfectMara Lee, Future Perfect (Future Perfect)

Albert Bonniers förlag, 2014.

Reviewed by B.J. Epstein ▸Read Review


Allt det där jag sa till dig var santAmanda Svensson, Allt det där jag sa till dig var sant (Everything I Said to You Was True)

Norstedts, 2014.

Reviewed by B.J. Epstein ▸Read Review


KassandraCarin Bartosch Edström, Kassandra (Cassandra)

Albert Bonniers förlag, 2014.

Reviewed by Deborah Bragan-Turner ▸Read Review


SkalpelldansenJenny Milewski, Skalpelldansen (Dance of the Scalpel)

Telegram Bokförlag, 2012.

Reviewed by Anna Holmwood ▸Read Review


Kalmars jägarinnorTove Folkesson, Kalmars jägarinnor (The Huntresses of Kalmar)

Weyler förlag, 2013.

Reviewed by Mia Österlund ▸Read Review


Du vet väl om att du är värdefullStefan Lindberg, Du vet väl om att du är värdefull (You Know You're Precious, Don't You?)

Albert Bonniers förlag, 2014.

Reviewed by Mia Österlund ▸Read Review


Plikten, profiten och konsten att vara människaGöran Rosenberg, Plikten, profiten och konsten att vara människa (Duty, Profit and the Art of Being Human)

Albert Bonniers förlag, 2013.

Reviewed by Fiona Graham ▸Read Review


AmatkaKarin Tidbeck, Amatka

Mix Förlag, 2012.

Reviewed by Agnes Broome ▸Read Review


Current Issue: 2017:1

Issue 2017-1

Copyright © 2017 Swedish Book Review | Contact Details | Web Design by Intexta